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This company decided to find out what 8 famous places would look like without visual pollution, and here is the result.

The concept of “visual pollution” refers to the presence of artificial elements such as billboards and cables in cities, which can negatively affect the aesthetic quality of the environment and potentially cause mental health problems for some individuals. are, especially those with sensory sensitivities. A company has edited photos of the signs to show what they would look like without these elements, raising questions about what the city would look like if the visual noise were removed.

Visual pollution can include illuminated panels, cables and billboards. These visual distractions can be considered part of the identity of a big city, but can be a problem for some, especially those with sensory sensitivities. Constant bombardment of complex images can affect the brain, leading to anxiety, exhaustion and depression. A company called “House Fresh” edited 8 photos of famous cities around the world to show how removing these elements can create a cleaner, more visually appealing environment.

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Mong Kok District, Hong Kong

Image credit: Home fresh

Some consider Hong Kong’s neon signs an integral part of the city’s “image and heritage”. However, one of these symptoms is a significant number of illegal structures that not only detract from the beauty of the city but also pose a physical hazard. In the densely populated area of ​​Mong Kok, where competition for customers is high, traders rely on bright lights to attract attention.

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Image credit: Home fresh

The reality beneath the surface of Mongkok is not attractive, but it is impressive. With a solar-pink conversion, or even just the addition of exterior residential walls, this densely populated area can be transformed into a more enjoyable and sustainable place to live and shop.

Delhi, India

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Image credit: Home fresh

Visual pollution is a major problem in India’s capital city. The air is filled with dust and smog, garbage litters the streets, and makeshift wires and cables, as seen in this Old Delhi neighborhood photo, are a far cry from the traditional billboards found in other major cities. leaves space.

Image credit: Home fresh

A clean-up effort has been launched in some areas, where the haphazard growth of phone and power infrastructure is intertwined with their surroundings, entangled and firmly attached to buildings. On the other hand, the colorfully painted walls beyond the wires suggest that Delhi’s hanging wires can be considered an art form in its own right.

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Shibuya Crossing, Japan

Image credit: Home fresh

With 2,500 pedestrians passing by at any given time, why shouldn’t businesses take advantage of the opportunity to monetize all those eyeballs by displaying flashy ads? Maybe it’s because the pink and purple sunsets that hide the crossing of the ancient Uda and Onden rivers down the road deserve better and shouldn’t be overshadowed by advertising.

Image credit: Home fresh

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Like Times Square, visual “pollution” is an integral part of Shibuya Crossing’s identity. However, it is worth considering how the junction looks more thoughtfully to beautify the simple buildings and reduce the constant light pollution.

Hollywood Boulevard, USA

Image credit: Home fresh

Efforts to reduce visual clutter in LA have been ongoing for decades. However, some argue that without its iconic billboards, LA would lose its unique “image culture” that is the city’s primary source of revenue. Billboards on the boulevard have a rich history, ranging from kitschy iconography to high art.

Image credit: Home fresh

However, with its palm trees, abundance of Art Deco architecture, and beautiful sunsets, does Hollywood Boulevard really need the addition of tacky display ads and movie posters for movies that are already popular? The road is closer to heaven without them. It would be even better to walk it.

Las Vegas, USA

Image credit: Home fresh

The definition of visual pollution in Las Vegas is a matter of debate. Some visitors may be disappointed by the “clean” version of the city, as seen in the second photo. However, the level of light pollution in Las Vegas is significant enough to wash out the night sky, making it difficult to see the stars and meteors that would be visible from a desert city in a darker environment.

Image credit: Home fresh

Light from Vegas radiates into the surrounding natural environment, disrupting the life cycle of plants and animals. Furthermore, if one of the purposes of the Vegas lights is to disrupt the sleep patterns of gamblers and keep them awake at night, this highlights some of the negative effects of this phenomenon on human health. Continuous exposure to artificial light can lead to various health problems such as obesity, heart disease, diabetes, depression and cancer. All-night light shows may save on coffee bills, but the negative effects on our circadian rhythms aren’t worth it.

Piccadilly Circus, London, UK

Image credit: Home fresh

Illuminated signs have been a feature of this busy London transport hub since 1908, with the first neon signs appearing in the 1940s. As early as 1928, The Times newspaper stated that “From an aesthetic point of view, it would be a decided advantage to get rid of the illuminated signs on the facades of these buildings. They are such a hideous eyesore by day as by night.” are not tolerated by any civilized class, especially in such an important and important position. The opinion underscores the long-standing debate about the impact of illuminated signs on the city’s aesthetics and their impact on the community.

Image credit: Home fresh

Today, only giant signs with advertising are prohibited in buildings owned by the Crown Estate. However, the scale of the landmark and the importance of the area as a junction and entertainment district mean that it is still referred to as “London’s Times Square”. In 2007, the lights were switched off for an hour during the Lights Out London campaign, but they were only dimmed to commemorate war, energy shortages, and the mourning of figures such as Winston Churchill and Diana, Princess of Wales. .

Times Square, New York, USA

Image credit: Home fresh

Times Square is a classic example of “visual pollution”. Its illuminated billboards are protected by law to preserve the commercial intersection’s “identity” (and revenue). New York City requires illuminated signage for buildings, and in the 1980s, set a requirement for new developments that 5% of the floor space be devoted to entertainment. This is probably the reason why the natural beauty of this area is not taken into consideration as a recreation.

Image credit: Home fresh

Given its iconic status in the American imagination, Times Square is at the center of a debate over whether what one person considers visual pollution, another may see as a natural modern habitat. Some argue that the square’s previous form of visual pollution, including dirt, aging billboards and cinema signs, was a tragic loss, as it provided a welcoming backdrop for city-goers. what was On the other hand, the current Times Square evokes the greed and excess of the 1980s, when the “Disneyfication” of the Square began. Is there a more sensible way to update Times Square’s visual landscape for the mid-21st century?

Kampala, Uganda

Image credit: Home fresh

The before-and-after photos from Uganda raise an important question that pertains to all other concepts: Are cars considered “visual pollution”? Cars are included in these images because they are part of the experience of visual pollution for people everywhere. However, it’s worth considering how many times a car has ruined an otherwise perfect photo opportunity or caused a headache after driving down a busy road. Cars, like other forms of transportation, can be seen as a source of visual pollution because of the aesthetic impact they have on the environment and surrounding areas.

Image credit: Home fresh

Cars are often perceived as unattractive, dirty, distracting, and out of place, and they also contribute to additional visual pollution, such as emissions, moving reflections, and excess signage. Fortunately, Kampala is addressing both visual and air pollution by being named Africa’s first Tree City due to efforts to plant and protect urban trees. This is a positive step towards creating a more sustainable and visually pleasing urban environment.



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